March For Our Lives

Photographs and Interviews for Glamour Magazine

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Paul Mccartney & Nancy Shevell

In New York City, marchers took to the streets in droves—among them, Paul McCartney. "One of my best friends was killed in gun violence right around here," McCartney told CNN, "so it's important to me."

Aya, 17

How does gun violence affect your everyday life?

Teenagers need to wake up and realize what’s going on, because a lot of people, even in my own personal school, aren’t taking it as seriously as it should be. We just saw that 17 lives went away before our eyes, and no one batted an eyelash. I think it should be noticed more and acknowledged more that it’s happening right in front of our eyes."

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Aliana, 17; Nahjie, 17; Alyssa, 17

Do you guys remember your first experience with gun violence? Either personally or something you saw on TV?

Nahjie: Personally, this Parkland shooting. I lost my friend Joaquin in it. And that was just…now it needs to change.

Do you think your opinions changed now that you have lost someone, or had you felt passionate about it before?

Nahjie: It was always a big problem, but it's one of those things: You think it's never going to happen to you, and then it does, and it changes you completely. And you hear it on the news, and you’re like, “Oh that’s sad,” but you don’t really relate to it as much because you don’t know the people. Then when you see people you know on the news that are gone, it's like crazy. In a blink of an eye someone’s life can be taken. And it's not worth it.

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Gabrielle, 23

How does gun violence affect your everyday life?

Well as one of my day jobs, I’m a preschool teacher, and that’s terrifying. It’s terrifying. These kids are as pure as they get, you know, and in New York, it’s hard to move around in your day-to-day life. It's busy, it's exhausting, and these kids bring so much joy so much light. They are our future, and I'm getting text messages from the Citizen app saying “someone threatening to shoot.” You know what I mean? It’s terrifying.

How do you feel about [politicians suggesting] teachers they should have guns in classrooms?

Oh my god, are you fucking kidding me? They did not sign up to be cops. They signed up to be teachers... Not to mention, we already have, unfortunately, mental illness and just, like, bad things going on for children in this world right now. You really think we should have a gun in every single room that they are learning in? With bullying around. With drugs around. Like what are we thinking?

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Janene, 21

Do you remember your first experience with gun violence?

I haven’t had a personal one, but I know Columbine was a big thing when I was little, and I didn’t realize until Sandy Hook how real it is. You see these things on TV all the time and you don’t realize how impactful it is until ... And each time it happens, it sucks that it has to take this many times for people to actually rally together and unite their voices. But if that’s what it takes, it’s good that we're all together.

How does gun violence affect your everyday life? Do you fear going places?

Oh, going to college every single day is a thought process. This is my first time in New York, so every time we’re on the train, being wary of who enters in. It shouldn’t be like that ever, but it sucks, and it’s our reality.

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Jordyn, 16

Do you remember your first experience with gun violence?

When I was little, there was a shooting across [from] my house, and I remember the police came to my house. That was the first thing that ever happened [to me] directly, [but] I heard about other shootings, and I just thought it was horrible.

How does gun violence affect your everyday life?

Gun violence affects my everyday life, because I have to go to school and be scared because I don’t know whether or not I’m going to get shot the next day, because it’s so easy to get ahold of automatic rifles and a bunch of military-grade weapons. It’s ridiculous.

 

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Janet, 89

Do you know anyone that owns guns? Have you told anyone you’re marching today?

The whole family, I mean people own guns.

Do you feel safe? How has gun violence affected your everyday life?

It doesn’t affect it, I move on ... But I want to help! So [the students] have some good rules.

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Helena, 39

Do you remember your first experience with gun violence?

Well, Columbine probably. Yeah, that was the biggest one.

How does gun violence affect your everyday life?

Well I have two kids right here, so I just think about the possibility of them getting shot at school or anywhere on the streets, and I think we are going in the wrong, bad direction of the United States, where more and more people are owning guns, and the NRA is getting more and more powerful, and it's just disgusting and horrifying really to say the least.

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Sophie, 12

Why are you marching today?

Because it is wrong that people would kill innocent children. Guns are way less important than people.

How has gun violence affected your everyday life?

I am in school; I don’t want to be killed. Everybody has a family, and every person that is shot or killed has a family, and for people to take that away from them [using] these weapons that are military grade is just awful.

 

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Lauren, 20

Do you know what your first experience with gun violence was?

Personally, I have family members who have died from gun violence, so I know the feeling. That’s why I connected so deeply with the kids from Parkland, with the kids from Newtown, from the kids in Columbine—even if it’s not in schools, just shootings everywhere.

Why are you marching today?

I just want to be a part of something that’s greater than myself. I want to be able to tell my kids when I get older that I did this, that this is something that I should be proud of. Also I want to stop the gun violence—that’s the main reason.